DR.MOHAMMED IRFAN SHEIKH
DR.MOHAMMED IRFAN SHEIKH
in Case Study
Paraneoplastic Neuromyotonia
Dr. Aiswarya Vijayan
Dr. Aiswarya Vijayan
in Case Study
Neurocysticercosis
Neurocysticercosis
Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a neurologic infection caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Taenia solium. In the developing world, NCC, infection of the central nervous system (CNS) with the T. solium larvae, is the most common cause of acquired epilepsy [1–3]. Infections are generally treated with anti-parasitic drugs in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs. Surgery is sometimes necessary to treat cysts in certain locations, when patients are not responsive to drug treatment, or to reduce brain swelling. Not all cases of cysticercosisneed treatment.The diagnosis of neurocysticercosis usually requires MRI or CT brain scans. Blood tests may be useful to help diagnose an infection, but they may not always be positive in light infections. If you have been diagnosed with cysticercosis, you and your family members should be tested for intestinal tapeworm infection.Neurocysticercosis is a preventable parasitic infection caused by larval cysts (enclosed sacs containing the immature stage of a parasite) of the pork tapeworm (Taenia solium).Neurocysticercosis, which affects the brain and is the most severe form of the disease, can be fatal.Cysticercosis is a parasitic tissue infection caused by larval cysts of the tapeworm Taenia solium. These larval cysts infect brain, muscle, or other tissue, and are a major cause of adult onset seizures in most low-income countries.Symptomatic therapy is the mainstay of treatmentfor neurocysticercosis, as follows: Anticonvulsants are prescribed to patients with seizures. Specific anthelminthic therapy with albendazole or praziquantel is prescribed, usually accompanied by corticosteroids.
DR.MOHAMMED IRFAN SHEIKH
DR.MOHAMMED IRFAN SHEIKH
in Case Study
Mitral Annular Calcification
Mitral Annular Calcification
An 81-year-old woman was transferred to the medical service with cardiac failure after surgery for oral cancer. A diagnostic workup indicated perioperative overhydration and pulmonary embolism as causative factors for her symptoms. Chest radiography revealed a large, dense area of calcification overlying the heart, consistent with mitral annular calcification. Calcification was semicircular in the location of the mitral valve, as seen on the preoperative posterior–anterior view (Panel A, arrowhead; Panel B, arrow, shows an enlarged view) and a lateral view (Panel C, arrowhead). Computed tomography revealed calcification of the posterolateral mitral-valve annulus on the axial view (Panel D, arrowhead) and the short-axis view (Panel E). Transthoracic echocardiography revealed moderate mitral regurgitation and stenosis, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 69%. Mitral annular calcification is often detected on routine chest radiographs in elderly patients and is considered to be a degenerative condition that is usually unrelated to clinical symptoms. When mitral annular calcification is massive, it can lead to valvular dysfunction (as in this patient), typically resulting in complete heart block, mitral regurgitation, or less often, mitral stenosis. Mitral annular calcification may be related to diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and secondary hyperparathyroidism from renal failure. During her hospitalization, the patient was conservatively treated with oral heart medication. No surgery was performed, and the patient was lost to follow-up.
Page: 1 / 1022
1231022
Success